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Current Scholars
Class of:

2012

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Welcome Class of 2012 (6 Scholars)
September

We are excited to introduce six new faculty members who have been named University of Michigan Biological Sciences Scholars (BSSP). They bring an abundance of skills and research discoveries, which we will note here as their research programs continue. Most have recently arrived or will start soon.

Welcome to our research community!

 

Stephanie Bielas, Ph.D.
University of California, San Diego, Biology/Neurobiology
U-M Department: Human Genetics

 

Uhn Soo Cho, Ph.D.
Harvard Medical School, Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology
U-M Department: Biological Chemistry

 

Shigeki Iwase, Ph.D.
Harvard Medical School, Newborn Medicine and Epigenetics
U-M Department: Human Genetics

 

Kenneth Kwan, Ph.D.
Yale University, Neurobiology
U-M Departments: Molecular and Behavioral Neuroscience Institute and Human Genetics

 

Adam Lauring, M.D., Ph.D.
University of California, San Francisco, Infectious Diseases
U-M Departments: Internal Medicine - Infectious Diseases and Microbiology and Immunology

 

Scott Tomlins, M.D., Ph.D.
University of Michigan, Pathology
U-M Department: Pathology

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Class of 2011 (7 Scholars)

Dr. Maria Figueroa

Maria E. Figueroa, M.D.
marfigue@umich.edu
Affiliation(s): Pathology
Website

Research Interests:
Epigenetic regulation during normal and malignant hematopoiesis, with particular interest in DNA methylation and DNA hydroxymethylation

Image of Jeffrey Kidd

Jeffrey Kidd, Ph.D.
jmkidd@umich.edu
Affiliation(s): Human Genetics
Computational Medicine and Bioinformatics
Website

Research Interests:
We apply a genome-wide approach to understanding the processes that shape the structure, content, and sequence variation of genomes among human populations and between species. We seek to understand how biological and historic population processes act to shape genomic variation and how this variation leads to the wide range of phenotypic diversity observed in the natural world.

Image of Jun Hee Lee

Jun Hee Lee, Ph.D.
leeju@umich.edu
Affiliation(s): Molecular and Integrative Physiology
Institute of Gerontology
Website

Research Interests:
We focus on diverse physiologies including growth, development and aging that are controlled by signal transduction networks. Recently, our research has revealed that Sestrin, a stress-inducible protein, is a feedback inhibitor of TOR signaling, and that loss of Sestrin can cause various chronic TOR-associated pathologies, such as fat accumulation, mitochondrial dysfunction, cardiac arrhythmia and muscle degeneration. These phenotypes are quite similar to those associated with obesity, aging and lack of exercise, which are currently some of the major public health issues facing our society. We expect that further research on mammalian Sestrin-family proteins may provide a novel way to attenuate aging and prevent or treat age-associated diseases in humans.

Photo of Dr. Daniel Southworth

Daniel R. Southworth, Ph.D.
dsouth@umich.edu
Affiliation(s): Biological Chemistry
Life Sciences Institute
Website

Research Interests:
In the Southworth lab we use cryo-electron microscopy to determine the structure of dynamic protein complexes central to cellular signaling and homeostasis. This structural focus is coupled to key biochemical methods in order to directly attribute biological mechanisms to the protein:protein interactions and conformational changes we identify at the single molecule level. Specifically we are focused on understanding how molecular chaperones and co-regulatory proteins function at the interface of protein folding, activation and degradation pathways.

Photo of Jason Spence

Jason R. Spence, Ph.D.
spencejr@umich.edu
Affiliation(s): Internal Medicine - Gastroenterology
Website

Research Interests:
Developmental Biology: Using model organisms to understand mechanisms by which the embryo develops, with a focus on specification, differentiation and organogenesis of tissue derived from the endoderm. Our current studies use the mouse as a model system to investigate mechanisms of intestine development and disease.
Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine: Directing differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells into different endodermal lineages, with a focus on intestine, such that we may generate tissue for replacement therapies and discover novel in vitro methods to model and study human development and disease.

Photo of Ryan Wilcox

Ryan Wilcox, M.D., Ph.D.
rywilcox@umich.edu
Affiliation(s): Internal Medicine - Hematology / Oncology
Website

Research Interests:
My clinical interests include the care and management of patients with a variety of lymphoproliferative disorders, particularly peripheral and cutaneous T-cell lymphomas.
My research is to better understand the mechanisms used by cancer cells to suppress host immunity so as to develop improved treatment strategies.
1. The role of the tumor microenvironment, particularly myeloid-derived cells, in lymphoproliferative disorders
2. Pathogenesis of T-cell lymphoproliferative disorders
3. Mechanisms of immune suppression mediated by myeloid-derived cells in cancer
4. Development of novel therapeutic strategies targeting the tumor microenvironment

Photo  of Sunny Wong

Sunny Wong, Ph.D.
sunnyw@umich.edu
Affiliation(s): Dermatology
Cell and Developmental Biology
Website

Research Interests:
Our major focus is to investigate the roles of different stem cell populations during hair follicle development, wound healing and tumorigenesis. Our previous work revealed that wounding can recruit oncogene-expressing stem cells from a hair follicle niche into sites of injury, where they subsequently give rise to tumors resembling basal cell carcinomas (BCCs), the most common cancer in North America. Our current work is focused on understanding the migratory factors that promote the trafficking of hair follicle stem cells to wound sites and the regenerative behavior of these cells once they have reached their destination. We are also studying the signaling pathways that mediate BCC carcinogenesis, including Hedgehog, Wnt and Notch, as well as other factors that impinge upon transduction of these networks. We are also examining BCC tumor progression in the context of normal hair follicle development.

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Class of 2010 (7 Scholars)

Laura Buttitta

Laura Buttitta, Ph.D.
buttita@umich.edu
Affiliation(s): Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology, College of Literature, Science & the Arts
Website

Research Interests:
We study how the cell cycle is regulated to speed up, slow down or stop cell proliferation at the right places and times during development.

Image of Irina Grigova

Irina L. Grigorova, Ph.D.
igrigor@umich.edu
Affiliation(s): Microbiology and Immunology
Website

Research Interests:
My research interests are directed at understanding the quantitative principles that underlay "signal processing" in an adaptive immune response, specifically in initiation of the humoral (antibody) immune response. My lab will explore whether there are any currently unknown factors that could facilitate the interactions between rare activated T and B cells.

Dr. Joglekar

Ajit P. Joglekar, Ph.D
ajitj@umich.edu
Affiliation(s): Cellular and Developmental Biology, Medical School; Biophysics, College of Literature, Science, & the Arts; Biomedical Engineering, College of Engineering
Website

Research Interests:
Cellular Biophysics of macromolecular protein machines with in vivo and in vitro fluorescence microscopy techniques and biophysical analysis. Current focus is on the molecular mechanisms of kinetochore function and regulation during cell division.

Photo of Dr. Ann Miller

Ann L. Miller, Ph.D.
annlm@umich.edu
Affiliation(s): Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology, College of Literature, Science & the Arts
Website

Research Interests:
We are investigating how the small GTPase Rho regulates cytokinesis normally and how the Rho signaling pathway may become mis-regulated in cancers. Our work is carried out in the context of an intact epithelium using Xenopus laevis (African clawed frog) embryos as a model system.

Headshot Sivaraj Sivaramakrishnan

Sivaraj Sivaramakrishnan, Ph.D.
sivaraj@umich.edu
Affiliation(s): Celluar and Developmental Biology. Medical School
Biophysic, College of Literature, Science, & the Arts
Biomedical Engineering, College of Engineering
Website

Research Interests:
We are engineering proteins into revealing the secrets of how they function within live cells. Every eukaryotic cell is comprised of a vast and dense network of proteins that perform diverse functions from simple go-between adaptors to complex mega-machines.

Photo of Elizabeth Speliotes

Elizabeth Speliotes, M.D., Ph.D., M.P.H.
espeliot@umich.edu
Affiliation(s): Internal Medicine - Gastroenterology , Computational Medicine and Bioinformatics
Website

Research Interests:
Obesity and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) have reached epidemic proportions throughout the world but are poorly understood and have limited treatment options. Our laboratory uses human population based approaches (genome wide association studies, sequencing, genetic epidemiology) and is developing cell culture/mouse models of disease to elucidate the mechanisms that predispose individuals to developing these and related metabolic diseases. Through this work, we aim to better diagnose, manage, and treat obesity and NAFLD in the future.

Dr. Cristen Willer

Cristen J. Willer, Ph.D.
cristen@umich.edu
Affiliation(s): Internal Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine
Human Genetics
Computational Medicine and Bioinformatics
Website

Research Interests:
Our research group focuses on the analysis of high-throughput genetic and sequencing data to understand the genetic basis of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. We have identified several hundred new genetic regions associated with lipid levels and obesity using whole-genome association studies and are now moving towards fine-mapping these loci to identify functional genetic variants. We are also performing whole exome and whole genome sequencing studies to identify rare genetic variants with potentially large effects on disease risk.

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Class of 2009 (8 Scholars)

Allen

ALLEN, Benjamin, Ph.D.
benallen@umich.edu
Affiliation(s): Cell and Developmental Biology
Website

Research Interests:
Research in the Allen Lab is broadly focused on understanding the mechanisms of growth factor and morphogen signaling in development and disease. Specifically, we study the regulation of Hedgehog (Hh) signaling in vertebrate embryogenesis using a wide range of approaches, including mouse developmental genetics, chick in ovo electroporation, biochemistry, and cell biology.

Biteen

BITEEN, Julie, Ph.D.
jsbiteen@umich.edu
Affiliation(s): Chemistry, Biophysics, and Applied Physics
Website

Research Interests:
My lab is interested in super-resolution bio-imaging based on single-molecule fluorescence. We are focused on adapting technologies for live-cell imaging and on developing new techniques to extend the capabilities of these methods.

Kalantry

KALANTRY, Sundeep, Ph.D.
kalantry@umich.edu
Affiliation(s): Human Genetics
Website

Research Interests:
Our research aims to define the epigenetic mechanisms that regulate X-chromosome inactivation, which results in transcriptional silencing of most genes along one of the two X-chromosomes in female mammals. While many forms of epigenetic modifications of chromatin correlate with silenced gene expression on the inactive-X, those that trigger gene silencing remain elusive. The identification of factors and mechanisms that bring about heritable changes in gene expression is the focus of our research.

Martens

MARTENS, Eric, Ph.D.
emartens@umich.edu
Affiliation(s): Microbiology and Immunology
Website

Research Interests:
My lab uses genomic, molecular genetic and biochemical techniques to investigate how human colonic bacteria recognize and degrade the myriad of complex glycans that constantly inundate our digestive tract. Using in vivo models like gnotobiotic mice, we seek to gain a deeper understanding of the microbiota's impact on digestive health and also uncover mechanistic insights into how our diet influences the composition and physiology of this key "microbial organ."

Shah

SHAH, Yatrik, Ph.D.
shahy@umich.edu
Affiliation(s): Internal Medicine-Gastroenterology / Molecular and Integrative Physiology
Website

Research Interests:
The major goal of our research program is to determine the molecular mechanisms by which oxygen sensing transcription factors regulate gastrointestinal homeostasis, inflammation and cancer. Cellular oxygen level is an important systemic signal that modulates metabolic activities and disease in the liver and intestine. Using the latest in mouse transgenic technology we have developed novel animal models to study accurately the role of oxygen sensitive transcription factors in the liver and intestine.

Shavit

SHAVIT, Jordan, M.D., Ph.D.
jshavit@umich.edu
Affiliation(s): Pediatrics & Communicable Diseases-Hematology/Oncology
Website

Research Interests:
The Shavit laboratory studies the genetics of human blood clotting disorders using zebrafish and mouse models. We are developing large-scale zebrafish mutagenesis screens to identify genetic and chemical modifiers of these disorders. This will be followed by investigation of these modifiers in mouse models and human populations.

Veatch

VEATCH, Sarah, Ph.D.
sveatch@umich.edu
Affiliation(s): Biophysics
Website

Research Interests:
There is increasing evidence that lipids can influence the organization and function of plasma membrane proteins. We are interested in understanding how the physical properties of lipids, lipid mixtures, and lipid-protein interactions influence plasma membrane heterogeneity and cellular responses.

Yin

YIN, Lei, Ph.D.
leiyin@umich.edu
Affiliation(s): Molecular and Integrative Physiology / Internal Medicine-Endocrinology

Research Interests:
The Yin laboratory is interested in the biochemistry and physiology of post-translational modifications in circadian rhythm and metabolism. One of major tasks in the lab is to map the ubiquitination codes for core clock proteins and study the in vivo biology of such modification. This work will advance our understanding the basic mechanisms underlying the circadian rhythms.

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Class of 2008 (9 Scholars)

Beg

BEG, Asim, Ph.D.
asimbeg@umich.edu
Affiliation(s): Pharmacology / Neuroscience
Website

Research Interests:
Our lab studies the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying neuronal circuit assembly and function. We are particularly interested in understanding how the central nervous system controls movement from both physiological and behavioral perspectives.

Goldstrohm

GOLDSTROHM, Aaron, Ph.D.
acgold@umich.edu
Affiliation(s): Biological Chemistry
Website

Research Interests:
We study the regulation of messenger RNAs in eukaryotes, focusing on the control of mRNA stability, translation, and localization by RNA-binding proteins and ribonucleases. These mechanisms control protein production in a variety of contexts spanning development, differentiation, the nervous system, and stem cells. We utilize biochemical, genetic, and cell-based approaches to explore regulation in yeast, Drosophila, and human cells. High throughput screens are being developed to identify regulatory mechanisms and chemical inhibitors that can modulate gene expression.

Inoki

INOKI, Ken, M.D., Ph.D.
inokik@umich.edu
Affiliation(s): Life Sciences Institute / Molecular and Integrative Physiology / Internal Medicine-Nephrology
Website - Life Sciences Institute
Website - Molecular and Integrative Physiology

Research Interests:
The Inoki lab studies the role of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling in the development of cancer and metabolic disorders such as diabetes using mouse models. Our lab also investigates the molecular mechanisms by which mTOR pathway is regulated by extra- and intracellular cues using cell biology, biochemical, and genetic approaches.

Lim

LIM, Mi Hee, Ph.D.
mhlim@umich.edu
Affiliation(s): Chemistry / Life Sciences Institute
Website - Chemistry
Website - Life Sciences Institute

Research Interests:
Dr. Lim’ research interests lie in the broad field of chemistry as it interfaces with biology and medicine. Studying the role of metal ions and their implications for neurodegenerative diseases, in particular, Alzheimer’s disease, Dr. Lim has pursued two different approaches: (a) Investigation of metal ions in vivo samples using a variety of spectroscopy; and (b) Development of nontoxic, small molecules that target metal-peptide/protein species, which can serve as chemical tools and potential therapeutic agents for the disease.

Lombard

LOMBARD, David, M.D., Ph.D.
davidlom@umich.edu
Affiliation(s): Institute of Gerontology / Pathology
Website

Research Interests:
Aging is a conserved but poorly understood biological phenomenon. In invertebrates, overexpression of sirtuins – homologs of the yeast Sir2 deacetylase – confers increased lifespan. Mammals possess seven sirtuins, called SIRT1-SIRT7. Many of these proteins modulate metabolic processes. Our group focuses on the mitochondrial sirtuin SIRT3 and the nuclear sirtuin SIRT6. We are attempting to elucidate links between these sirtuins and metabolism, cancer, and aging.

Lumeng

LUMENG, Carey, M.D., Ph.D.
clumeng@umich.edu
Affiliation(s): Pediatrics & Communicable Diseases-Pulmonary Medicine, Molecular and Integrative Physiology
Website

Research Interests:
Our laboratory is interested in how inflammatory cells and pathways are activated in obesity and how this leads to diseases such as type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome. We utilize animal models, cell biology, and biochemistry techniques to understand how inflammatory cells in fat are recruited to adipose tissue and how this contributes to metabolic diseases. The lab is focused on understanding the biology of adipose tissue macrophages, a novel type of inflammatory cell that invades fat with obesity and alters the normal function of adipose tissue.

Pasca di Magliano

PASCA DI MAGLIANO, Marina, Ph.D.
marinapa@umich.edu
Affiliation(s): Surgery - General Surgery / Cell and Developmental Biology
Website - Surgery - General Surgery
Website - Cell and Developmental Biology

Research Interests:
My laboratory studies the formation and progression of pancreatic cancer.  The onset of pancreatic cancer is characterized by activation of signaling pathways that are quiescent in the normal pancreas. We are in particular interested in the Hedgehog signaling pathway, that acts in a paracrine manner to mediate the interaction of tumor cells with their surrounding microenvironment (or tumor stroma). Our long-term goal is to target tumor-stroma interactions for the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

Skiniotis

SKINIOTIS, Georgios, Ph.D.
skinioti@umich.edu
Affiliation(s): Biological Chemistry / Life Sciences Institute
Website

Research Interests:
The Skiniotis Lab is employing molecular electron microscopy techniques (cryo-EM and negative stain EM) to study the architecture and conformational dynamics of complex protein assemblies. Complemented by a variety of biochemical and biophysical methods, the group aims to address structural and mechanistic issues in important biological processes.

Ye

YE, Bing, Ph.D.
bingye@umich.edu
Affiliation(s): Cell and Developmental Biology / Life Sciences Institute
Website

Research Interests:
We study how distinct subcellular compartments are established in neurons and how this process contributes to the organization of the nervous system. We are particularly interested in the differential development between dendrites and axons and the strategic distribution of synapses in subcellular compartments. We employ a multi-disciplinary approach, including genetics, molecular biology, biochemistry, and advanced multi-dimensional imaging, to study these problems in both Drosophila and mammals.

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Class of 2007 (1 Scholar)

MAILLARD, Ivan, M.D., Ph.D.
imaillar@umich.edu
Affiliation(s): Internal Medicine-Hematology/Oncology / Cell and Developmental Biology / Life Sciences Institute
Website

Research Interests:
Maillard lab investigates the interaction of blood-forming stem cells with their environment, using the mouse as a model organism.

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Class of 2006 (13 Scholars)

carroll

CARROLL, Kate (Ph.D.)
katesc@umich.edu
Affiliation(s): Life Sciences Institute / Chemistry
Website - Life Sciences Institute
Website - Chemistry

Research Interests:
Dr. Carroll investigates the role that sulfur-containing metabolites play in the persistence of Mycobacteria. The biosynthetic machinery associated with these critical metabolites may offer new targets for anti-tuberculosis therapy. In addition, Professor Carroll is also developing new chemical tools to identify and study oxidative post-translational modifications associated with cell migration, apoptosis, and neurodegeneration.

chan

CHAN, Raymond (Ph.D.)
rchan@umich.edu
Affiliation(s): Human Genetics / Internal Medicine-MMG
Website - Human Genetics
Website - Internal Medicine-MMG

Research Interests:
My lab is interested in the higher-order chromosome organization that impacts chromosome segregation, DNA repair and gene expression.  Our research is focused on the Structural Maintenance of Chromosomes (SMC) protein complexes and TIM-1, a novel regulator of a conserved SMC protein complex.

dou

DOU, Yali (Ph.D.)
yalid@umich.edu
Affiliation(s): Pathology / Biological Chemistry
Website

Research Interests:
Our broad objectives are to understand the mechanism of how chromatin regulatory events regulate gene expression and thus affect different biological pathways. The current lab focus is on one of the histone H3 lysine 4 methyltransferases MLL (mixed lineage leukemia protein) and its interacting partners.

han

HAN, Zhe (Ph.D.)
zhan@umich.edu
Affiliation(s): Internal Medicine-MMG / Cell and Developmental Biology
Website

Research Interests:
Genetic control of heart development in Drosophila

karbstein

KARBSTEIN, Katrin (Ph.D.)
kkarbst@umich.edu
Affiliation(s): Chemistry / Biological Chemistry
Website - Chemistry
Website - Biological Chemistry

Research Interests:
We use a combination of approaches - including biochemistry, mechanistic enzymology, protein engineering and yeast genetics - to study the complex biological process of eukaryotic ribosome assembly at the molecular level. Our ultimate goal is to understand the function of assembly factors, the order of events as well as the rationale for this order, aiming to delineate principles important for the assembly of other large RNA-protein complexes, such as the spliceosome or the signal recognition particle.

kim

KIM, John (Ph.D.)
jnkim@umich.edu
Affiliation(s): Life Sciences Institute / Human Genetics
Website

Research Interests:
The Kim Lab studies how microRNAs and other emerging classes of small RNAs regulate fundamental biological processes including neuronal and muscle development, germline maintenance, heterochromatin formation, and oncogenic cell proliferation. Using functional genomic, genetic, biochemical, cell biology, and computational strategies, our lab investigates the molecular mechanisms of both the small RNAs and new candidate RNAi/microRNA factors that we have identified by genome-wide screens.

laouar

LAOUAR, Yasmina (Ph.D.)
ylaouar@umich.edu
Affiliation(s): Microbiology and Immunology
Website

Research Interests:
The overall long-term goal of our laboratory is to understand the mechanisms of immunosuppression at the interface between innate and adaptive immunity.

lee

LEE, Cheng-Yu (Ph.D.)
leecheng@umich.edu
Affiliation(s): Life Sciences Institute / Internal Medicine-MMG / Cell and Developmental Biology
Website - Life Sciences Institute
Website - Internal Medicine-MMG

Research Interests:
My long-term goal is identify many signaling pathways expressed in both insect and vertebrate neural stem cells, and contribute to our understanding of neural stem cells in birth defects, regenerative medicine and cancer biology.

sutton

SUTTON, Michael (Ph.D.)
masutton@umich.edu
Affiliation(s): Molecular & Behavioral Neuroscience Institute / Molecular and Integrative Physiology
Website

Research Interests:
My lab studies the molecular mechanisms that control synapse development and plasticity in the mammalian hippocampus.

wobus

WOBUS, Christiane (Ph.D.)
cwobus@umich.edu
Affiliation(s): Microbiology and Immunology
Website
Website - Lab

Research Interests:
Mechanisms of norovirus entry into host cells in vitro and in vivo

xu_h

XU, Haoxing (Ph.D.)
haoxingx@umich.edu
Affiliation(s): Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology
Website

Research Interests:
We are interested in understanding the physiological and pathological functions of Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) ion channels and Ca2+ signaling. Currently we are focusing on the roles of TRP channels in somatosensory functions and sensory plasticity.

yamashita

YAMASHITA, Yukiko (Ph.D.)
yukikomy@umich.edu
Affiliation(s): Life Sciences Institute / Cell and Developmental Biology
Website - Life Sciences Institute
Website - Cell and Developmental Biology

Research Interests:
Yamashita lab investigates how adult stem cells decide upon their fate to maintain tissue stability.

yu

YU, Xiaochun (M.D., Ph.D.)
xiayu@umich.edu
Affiliation(s): Internal Medicine-MMG
Website

Research Interests:
Our lab focuses on the mechanisms of cell cycle checkpoint activation. Cell cycle checkpoints are self-defense systems of cells. When cells encounter external or internal hazards, such as X-ray, UV, DNA replication errors or mitotic stress, cell cycle checkpoints sense damages caused by these hazards, and stop cell cycle progression. Currently, by using various in vitro and in vivo approaches, we are studying the roles of several key players in the checkpoint pathways.

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Class of 2005 (7 Scholars)

csankovszki

CSANKOVSZKI, Gyorgyi (Ph.D.)
gyorgyi@umich.edu
Affiliation(s): Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology
Website

Research Interests:
We use dosage compensation in worms as a model system to study the role of higher order chromosome structure and organization in regulating gene expression.

gestwicki

GESTWICKI, Jason (Ph.D.)
gestwick@umich.edu
Affiliation(s): Life Sciences Institute / Pathology
Website - Life Sciences Institute
Website - Pathology

Research Interests:
Work in the Gestwicki laboratory focuses on applying new chemical tools to the study of fundamental questions in biology. We are interested in using small synthetic molecules to manipulate the position and function of proteins to shed light on the mechanisms of disease.

hu

HU, Patrick (M.D., Ph.D.)
pathu@umich.edu
Affiliation(s): Life Sciences Institute / Internal Medicine-Hematology/Oncology
Website

Research Interests:
The Hu lab uses the nematode C. elegans as a model system for studying evolutionarily conserved signal transduction pathways that are dysregulated in cancer and diabetes, with the eventual goal of generating hypotheses that can be tested in mouse models of human disease.

king

KING, Aaron (Ph.D.)
kingaa@umich.edu
Affiliation(s): Ecology and Evolutionary Biology / Mathematics
Website

Research Interests:
In the King lab, we develop and apply mathematical models and sophisticated computational tools to study ecological and evolutionary dynamics, especially the dynamics of infectious diseases.

lin

LIN, Jiandie (Ph.D.)
jdlin@umich.edu
Affiliation(s): Life Sciences Institute / Cell and Developmental Biology
Website - Life Sciences Institute
Website - Cell and Developmental Biology

Research Interests:
The Lin lab is studying transcriptional mechanisms that regulate metabolic programs and other biological processes in several tissues, including liver, brain, muscle and fat. Dr. Lin is focused on uncovering novel pathways and studying their roles in normal physiology and the pathogenesis of metabolic diseases.

rosenberg

ROSENBERG, Noah (Ph.D.)
rnoah@umich.edu
Affiliation(s): Bioinformatics / Human Genetics / Biostatistics / Life Sciences Institute / Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Website - Bioinformatics
Website - Human Genetics
Website - Biostatistics
Website - Life Sciences Institute
Website - Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

Research Interests:
Research in our group addresses problems in evolutionary biology and human genetics through a combination of mathematical modeling, computer simulations, development of statistical methods, and inference from population-genetic data. Current areas of interest include mathematical models of gene genealogies from one or more species, phylogenetic reconstruction taking into account differing signals from different genes, human variation and inference of human evolutionary history from genetic markers, and the relationship of human evolution to the search for disease-susceptibility genes.

umemori

UMEMORI, Hisashi (M.D.)
umemoh@umich.edu
Affiliation(s): Molecular & Behavioral Neuroscience Institute / Biological Chemistry
Website - Molecular & Behavioral Neuroscience Institute
Website - Biological Chemistry
Website - Neuroscience Graduate Program

Research Interests:
The goal of my laboratory is to reveal the molecular mechanisms of proper neural connections and synapse formation in the brain in vivo, and to implicate them to treatment of diseases with synaptic malfunction.

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Class of 2004 (3 Scholars)

lei

LEI, Ming (Ph.D.)
leim@umich.edu
Affiliation(s): Biological Chemistry
Website

Research Interests:
The goal of our laboratory is to understand the organization and dynamics of macromolecular assemblies important for genome regulation and stability. A combination of structural analyses, such as X-ray crystallography and electron microscopy, coupled with biophysical and biochemical experimentation, forms the core of our methodological approach.

myers

MYERS, Martin (M.D., Ph.D.)
mgmyers@umich.edu
Affiliation(s): Internal Medicine-MEND / Molecular and Integrative Physiology
Website - Internal Medicine-MEND
Website - Molecular and Integrative Physiology

Research Interests:
The central focus of this laboratory is on the biology of the leptin receptor and the mechanisms by which it controls basic cellular and neural processes that contribute to diabetes, endocrine function, and metabolism.

xu_x

XU, XZ Shawn (Ph.D.)
shawnxu@umich.edu
Affiliation(s): Life Sciences Institute / Molecular and Integrative Physiology
Website - Life Sciences Institute
Website - Molecular and Integrative Physiology

Research Interests:
Xu Lab studies neuronal signaling, behavior and drug addiction in the genetic model organism C. elegans using a multidisciplinary approach involving molecular genetics, cell biology, imaging, neurophysiology and genomics. In particular, they are interested in understanding how ion channels, membrane receptors and calcium signaling molecules regulate neural activity and plasticity.

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Class of 2003 (9 Scholars)

barolo

BAROLO, Scott (Ph.D.)
sbarolo@umich.edu
Affiliation(s): Cell and Developmental Biology
Website

Research Interests:
Our goal is to better understand the structure and function of signal-regulated transcriptional enhancers and their role in development. Using the Drosophila model system, we are employing biochemical, genetic, bioinformatic, evolutionary, and transgenic approaches to the study of these questions.

borjigin

BORJIGIN, Jimo (Ph.D.)
borjigin@umich.edu
Affiliation(s): Molecular and Integrative Physiology
Website

Research Interests:
Research in the Borjigin lab is focused on three areas: entrainment of circadian pacemaker using melatonin as readout; molecular mechanisms of melatonin production; role of PINA (PIneal and Night-specific ATPase) in circadian rhythm and Wilson disease.

ferguson

FERGUSON, David (M.D., Ph.D.)
daviferg@umich.edu
Affiliation(s): Pathology
Website

Research Interests:
The Ferguson Laboratory is interested in understanding how DNA repair in mammals works, and what roles it plays in cancer, immunity, and overall development. DNA damage occurs in many forms and numerous DNA repair complexes and pathways have evolved to combat them.

kumar

KUMAR, Anuj (Ph.D.)
anujk@umich.edu
Affiliation(s): Life Sciences Institute / Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology
Website

Research Interests:
The Kumar lab is interested in integrating the fields of genomics, proteomics, and bioinformatics as a means of investigating fundamental processes of cell biology in the bakers' yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This work will advance our understanding of signaling pathways and regulatory networks mediating cell cycle progression and cell growth – processes compromised in numerous diseases and myopathies.

michele

MICHELE, Daniel (Ph.D.)
dmichele@umich.edu
Affiliation(s): Molecular and Integrative Physiology / Internal Medicine-MMG
Website - Molecular and Integrative Physiology
Website - Internal Medicine-MMG

Research Interests:
The Michele laboratory is interested in the molecular mechanisms of human diseases of skeletal and cardiac muscle. By understanding molecular mechanisms of relatively rare genetic disorders, we hope to shed light on common mechanisms that cause more common idiopathic or acquired forms of skeletal muscle and cardiac disease.

rudenko

RUDENKO, Gabrielle (Ph.D.)
rudenko@umich.edu
Affiliation(s): Life Sciences Institute / Pharmacology
Website - Life Sciences Institute
Website - Pharmacology

Research Interests:
The Rudenko lab uses a variety of tools to determine the precise three-dimensional shape and function of biological molecules. Solving the structure of complex bio-molecules is a key to understanding the disease process and may play a role in designing drugs. Their latest work is focused on a class of protein molecules that play a key role in the brain’s ability adapt to physical and chemical insults.

sekiguchi

SEKIGUCHI, JoAnn (Ph.D.)
sekiguch@umich.edu
Affiliation(s): Internal Medicine-MMG / Human Genetics
Website - Internal Medicine-MMG
Website - Human Genetics

Research Interests:
Our lab studies mechanisms of DNA repair and how aberrant repair processes affect genomic stability, predisposition to cancer and immune system development. The projects in the lab are focused on characterizing the non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway of DNA double strand break repair, one of the two major pathways of double strand break repair in mammalian cells.

tsai

TSAI, Billy (Ph.D.)
btsai@umich.edu
Affiliation(s): Cell and Developmental Biology
Website

Research Interests:
We use biochemical and cell biological approaches to understand the nature of interaction between different toxins and viruses with their host cell. Specifically, we are studying how cholera toxin and polyoma/SV40 virus hijack cellular machineries to cause disease.

zhu

ZHU, Yuan (Ph.D.)
yuanzhu@umich.edu
Affiliation(s): Internal Medicine-MMG / Cell and Developmental Biology
Website - Internal Medicine-MMG
Website - Cell and Developmental Biology

Research Interests:
Molecular and genetic mechanisms underlying self-renewal and differentiation of neural stem cells and cancer stem cells in the nervous system.

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Class of 2001 (1 Scholar)

duckett

DUCKETT, Colin (Ph.D.)
colind@umich.edu
Affiliation(s): Internal Medicine-MMG / Pathology / Molecular Mechanisms of Disease Program
Website - Internal Medicine-MMG
Website - Pathology

Research Interests:
Our laboratory is interested in the control of cell survival by the iap (inhibitor of apoptosis) gene family, which encodes a group of factors with diverse cellular functions that range from suppression of apoptotic cell death by direct inhibition of apoptotic effector proteases to the control of mitotic spindle formation in conjunction with mitosis-regulated kinases.

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Class of 2000 (2 Scholars)

jakob

JAKOB, Ursula (Ph.D.)
ujakob@umich.edu
Affiliation(s): Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology
Website

Research Interests:
In the Jakob lab, we are using biochemical, cell biological and structural techniques to investigate the function and three-dimensional structure of new heat shock proteins, and we are applying proteomics to study the consequences of heat and oxidative stress on cells and organisms.

sunahara

SUNAHARA, Roger (Ph.D.)
sunahara@umich.edu
Affiliation(s): Pharmacology
Website

Research Interests:
Our laboratory is primarily interested in the biochemical dissection of members of the G protein-coupled receptor signaling  pathway and correlation of the structural and functional consequences of signal activation and propagation.

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Class of 1999 (2 Scholars)

iniguez-lluhi

IÑIGUEZ-LLUHI, Jorge (Ph.D.)
iniguez@umich.edu
Affiliation(s): Pharmacology
Website

Research Interests:
The focus of research in our lab is to gain fundamental mechanistic understanding of the basic mechanisms of transcription, the molecular basis of specific functional interactions among transcription factors and how these elements of genomic regulatory logic are assembled to give rise to complex patterns of gene expression in an intact developing tissue.

wilson

WILSON, Thomas (M.D., Ph.D.)
wilsonte@umich.edu
Affiliation(s): Pathology
Website

Research Interests:
The goal of our laboratory is to gain insight into the molecular basis of chromosomal rearrangement in cancer by systematically identifying both enzymatic and structural components of the DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair mechanisms and characterizing how these (and deficiencies therein) interact to achieve the sequence of biochemical events resulting in repair (or rearrangement). This is done primarily using novel assays developed in the genetically tractable model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae, since it is now clear that the fundamental mechanisms of DSB repair are preserved in all eukaryotes.

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Class of 1998 (4 Scholars)

collins

COLLINS, Kathleen (M.D., Ph.D.)
klcollin@umich.edu
Affiliation(s): Internal Medicine-Infectious Diseases / Microbiology and Immunology
Website - Internal Medicine-Infectious Diseases
Website - Microbiology and Immunology

Research Interests:
My laboratory is interested in understanding the factors that allow HIV to thwart the immune system. A clear understanding of the means by which the virus accomplishes this would allow the development of novel antiviral therapies.

moran

MORAN, John (Ph.D.)
moranj@umich.edu
Affiliation(s): Human Genetics / Internal Medicine-MMG
Website - Human Genetics
Website - Internal Medicine-MMG
Website - HHMI

Research Interests:
Our research focuses on a class of human ‘jumping genes’ known as Long Interspersed Element-1 sequences (LINE-1s).  LINE-1s comprise ~17% of human DNA. Our long-term goal is to gain a better understanding about how LINE-1 jumping leads to human disease and how this process has influenced the evolution of our genome.

morrison

MORRISON, Sean (Ph.D.)
seanjm@umich.edu
Affiliation(s): Life Sciences Institute / Internal Medicine-MMG / Howard Hughes Medical Institute
Website - Life Sciences Institute
Website - Internal Medicine-MMG

Research Interests:
The Morrison lab is investigating the mechanisms that regulate stem cell function in the nervous and hematopoietic systems. The goal of the Morrison lab is to integrate what we know about stem cells in different tissues to understand the extent to which they employ similar or different mechanisms to regulate critical functions. They have focused on the mechanisms that regulate stem cell self-renewal, stem cell aging, and the role of stem cells in organogenesis.

xu-z

XU, Zhaohui (Ph.D.)
zhaohui@umich.edu
Affiliation(s): Life Sciences Institute / Biological Chemistry
Website - Life Sciences Institute
Website - Biological Chemistry

Research Interests:
Xu lab is interested in understanding the structural basis of molecular interactions that govern the regulation of protein folding and protein trafficking inside the cell under both physiological and pathological conditions.

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